Renter’s Insurance-Are you overlooking this important coverage?

Renter’s Insurance-Are you overlooking this important coverage?

Homeowners and auto insurance are purchased without question for homeowners with cars, but what if you rent instead of own?  Why not consider Renter’s insurance?

According to a recent survey, 60% of renters do not carry Renter’s insurance. Many people think that they can’t afford it, or it’s not important. Truth is, Renters insurance is one of the most affordable and most important policies you can carry when you rent instead of own.

More than half of renters without a renter’s policy reported that they didn’t think they could afford it. Prices vary depending on the level of coverage you choose for your policy. The average cost of a renter’s policy is about $15 or less per month! That’s less than what the average American would pay a month on coffee at their favorite coffee shop.

17% of renters without a Renter’s policy said that they didn’t think Renter’s insurance was important.  That is so far from the truth.   It is very easy to think that a catastrophe won’t happen to you but in the United States, a house or apartment fire takes place every 90 seconds and break-ins occur every 15 seconds. When it comes to replacing everything you own in the event of a loss, the costs can add up very quickly. This is where Renter’s insurance offers you security.

If you are like 16% of renters who choose not to purchase Renters insurance and don’t fully understand what is covered, it is easy to think that you do not need it. In fact, many people assume that they are covered under their landlord’s policy or their family’s homeowner’s policy when renting at home. Your landlord’s policy only covers damage to the building, and your family’s homeowner’s policy will not cover your personal belongings if you are over the age of 18.

Individual Renter’s policies generally cover personal items that are lost due to fire, smoke, wind, hail, theft, vandalism and, in some cases, water damage.
Avoid being Part of the 60% of Americans that don’t have renters insurance and learn more about it today.

For more information on Renters insurance, please visit our website at www.chedwards.net or contact our office at 516-249-5200 and let us offer you a no-obligation quote.

by Denise Visco

What is a Notary Public?

What is a Notary Public?

A Notary Public (sometimes called a Notary or a Public Notary) is an individual authorized by the state or local government to officially witness signatures on legal documents, collect sworn statements and administer oaths.  A notary public uses an embossing tool to verify his or her presence at the time the documents were signed.  Most states issue a unique identifying number to each notary public in order to prevent fraudulent use of the embosser.

An attorney or other public figures can be granted notary public status, but no legal training is required to apply for the position.  Certain legal documents are required to be “notarized” in order to be recognized in court, so a notary public spends most of his or her time observing routine signatures.  Due to the fact that identities are so critical, a notary public may also spend some time verifying the names of the parties involved in the signing.  Generally, all parties provide some form of official identification (Driver’s license, birth certificate, passport, etc.) in order for the notary public to feel comfortable about certifying the signatures.

A qualified notary public should have a high level of integrity and respect for the legal process.  Several organizations offer courses on the legal and social aspects of becoming a notary public.  Notaries can not discriminate on the basis of race, sex, creed or religion.

C.H. Edwards, Inc. has a licensed notary on staff and we offer this service to our clients Free of Charge.  This is just an added benefit of choosing an Independent Insurance Agent.

Do not hesitate to come in and take advantage of the opportunity should the need arise.

Antique Jewelry and Fine Jewelry as gifts.  Did you remember Insurance?

Antique Jewelry and Fine Jewelry as gifts. Did you remember Insurance?

Unfortunately, many people who have antique and fine jewelry do not insure it properly and a large segment of this uninsured jewelry is given as gifts. It can often be overlooked insurance until the item is lost or stolen. Here are four simple steps to help you make sure your fine jewelry, antique jewelry and jewelry gifts are protected.

  1. Gather together all the valuables you would like insured. Don’t forget any fine jewelry that household family members have and any heirloom and antique jewelry. Once gathered, take a photo of each piece and it is also a good idea to get an appraisal on any piece that would be difficult to value in a picture alone. Make a list of these pieces and the photos and place them in a safe deposit box along with any jewelry that you won’t’ be wearing on a regular basis.
  2. Review your current insurance for the coverage you already have. You may have some jewelry coverage currently on your homeowner’s or Renters insurance. Check with your insurance agent and ask how much coverage you have for your fine jewelry. Have specifics from your list on what types of jewelry you have and the approximate value.
  3. Get Quotes on Jewelry Insurance. If you need to purchase additional insurance above and beyond what your homeowners or renters policy limits, get a quote from your current agent first. They may be able to give you the best deal since you are an existing customer with other policies in force. If you decide to comparison quote, keep in mind the deductible and don’t forget to ask for discounts if the jewelry is being stored in a safe deposit box.
  4. After you have a good Insurance Policy, Don’t forget about storage and reassessments. Always keep your jewelry in a safe, preferably locked place, such as a safe deposit box. As mentioned above, this may make your insurance lower and of course will reduce the risk of your jewelry being lost, damaged or stolen. Also, remember to get your jewelry coverage reassessed when you get new jewelry or on a regular annual basis, especially on pieces that you feel may go up in value.

By Steven Visco

Driving Safely in Snow and Ice

Driving Safely in Snow and Ice

Winter weather is here and so is the task of driving in snow and ice.  Of course,  the best advice for driving in bad winter weather is not to drive at all if it can be avoided. This is not always an option so try not to go out until snow plows and sanding trucks have had a chance to do their work.  Make sure and allow extra time to reach your destination.

Here are some tips to keep in mind for driving safely on icy roads 

  1.  Decrease your speed and leave yourself plenty of room to stop.  You should allow at least three times more space than usual between you and the car in front of you.
  2. Brake gently to avoid skidding.  If your wheels start to lock up, ease off the brake.
  3. Turn on your lights to increase visibility to other motorists.
  4. Keep your lights and windshield clean.
  5. Use low gears to keep traction, especially on hills.
  6. Don’t use cruise control or overdrive on icy roads.
  7. Be especially careful on bridges, overpasses and infrequently traveled roads which will freeze first.  Even at temperatures above freezing, if the conditions are wet, you might encounter ice in shady areas or on exposed roadways like bridges.
  8. Don’t pass snow plows and sanding trucks.  The drivers have limited visibility, and you’re likely to find the road in front of them worse than the road behind them.
  9. Don’t assume your vehicle can handle all conditions.  Even four-wheel drive vehicles can encounter trouble on winter roads.

Try to incorporate some of these tips into your winter driving experience and have a safe winter weather driving season.

For more information on Auto, Home, Business, Life, and Flood insurance, visit our website at www.chedwards.net.

For more helpful insurance tips and information visit us on Facebook at www.facebook.com/chedwardsinsurance

by Denise Visco

Do you know what the slowdown and move over laws mean?

Do you know what the slowdown and move over laws mean?

Insurance Tip Thursday
 
Do you know what the slowdown and move over laws mean?
 
Your driving and see emergency vehicles with flashing lights coming up behind you or stopped alongside the road as your passing, what do you do?
 
Under NYS law, drivers must exercise due care when approaching vehicles that have their emergency lights illuminated. On highways, that includes moving out of travel lanes next to shoulders, if possible.
 
There are versions of the Slow down, move over law in all 50 states. If you are unaware of your states law, visit DrivingLaws.AAA.com.
 
For more information on Auto, Home, Business, Life or Flood Insurance visit our website at www.chedwards.net
 
by Steven Visco
 
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